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Saturday, February 23, 2013

Yoga Vasishta and Buddha




I started re-reading Yoga Vasishta and was surprised to find many notes I have written all along the margins of the pages in Chapter 1.   My remarks were made to show how similar the passages are to Buddha’s teachings.

Here are the examples.  This chapter starts with Rama explaining why he is thinking deeply. and says: Asthira sarva eva, meaning that everything is impermanent.  Then he says : aayuh pallavakonagralamba  ambukanabhanguram which means, life is like a drop of water at the end of a blade of grass.

 In the next section, Rama is wondering how, when oceans dry up, stars disappear, saints die and even the pole star is not permanent, there is any assurance of longevity or permanence for ordinary mortals. He also says jeevitham dhukhamayam meaning that life is full of sorrow and asks Vasishta and Viswamitra:  yena noonam nirdhukhatham gathah which translates to : “How can I conquer sorrow?”. This is exactly the question Buddha asked too.

Friday, February 1, 2013

Reaching, Praying, Meditating



I am an Unknown; and I am reaching out to an unknowable.
Are prayer and meditation attempts to reach an unknowable by the unknown?
Is meditation a better mode, since
Meditation is to relate the personal to the Universal?
Meditation is to relate the wave to the ocean
It is to use the phenomenal body – mind -  awareness  complex  to abide constantly  in the Real Source
My “I” is one of the many ”I”s.
Therefore, it is Brahman and Atman, all at once, here and now
It is One and the Many at once
Meditation is to connect  to the One vertically
It is to connect to the many horizontally
It is to connect to the One and the many at the Same Time
And thus
Find the correct position of the “I” in this cosmos
And realize that we are all
Interconnected, Interdependent, Impermanent, "Inter-beings"

Soon after I explored these thoughts, I came across the following note of caution in David Deutsch’s book on The Beginning of Infinity. It says: “Trying to know the unknowable leads inexorably to error and self-deception”. One need to be cautious and humble.